Your Constant Companion

To A Successful Journey Through Life

6 Things I Observe About Ants When Faced With A Huge Obstacle

Posted on | October 24, 2012 | No Comments

I arrived here in Puerto Princesa, Palawan yesterday afternoon. It’s good to be back.

I woke up early at 5:30 even thought I ended up staying late last night with some of my nephews and family.

The first thing I did today was savor the fresh natural air of the city known for its natural resources and considered the last frontier of the country.

It would indeed be an absolute pleasure to be able to come here and live here one.

As I was breathing deep my attention was directed to a cockroach who was injured and limping. One of its feet was caught in a small crack on the pavement. I stoop down and watch how would the scene plays out. I knew that sooner than later ants will find the cockroach and I wanted to see how they would manage to maneuver such a big prey.

Here are 6 things i observed…

1. When tackling a potential food as big as a cockroach, the first one that finds it, runs as fast as it could to their colony to spread the news of the find. As soon as the ants in the colony heard the news. An amazing thing happened that really made me smile.

2. The colony did not immediately send off its whole workers but send out a few ants to validate the find. This totally blows me off.

The next sequence of events really had me thinking deep into my consciousness:

3. As soon as the small group validated that the find was still true and the cockroach was still in the location earlier reported. 2 or more went back to the colony to validate the earlier news, still the ant colony did not send its whole army of ants.

4. This time, they sent another group larger than the first one, but came along with them 1 winged ant. It was such a huge eye opener for me. And as soon as the winged ant saw the prey, it immediately thrust forward and hold the cockroach in the belly. The prey struggled hard but the winged-ant did not let go.

While all of these was going on, the smaller ants did not join the fray, instead they just encircled the scene with a few here and there biting the legs of the cockroach.

5. They surrounded the prey but did not immediately attack all at once. Only a few of the ants attacked the prey while many others surround it and the others looked like they were securing the perimeter for other ants of different colony.

6. While some head back to the colony base and return with even larger contingent of ants, sufficient enough to haul the prey. And as soon as the third group of larger company of ants reach the prey they immediately attacked along with those ants who was earlier encircling it.

Prey subdued! Hunt over!

All I can say is AMAZING creatures!

Quickly,  here are a few lessons coming to mind:

1. I should not tackle a prey alone that is much much larger than I can take.

2. I must trust people in my relationship to be able to help me when presented with such an enormous job or obstacle in life.

3. No matter how huge an obstacle is, it can be subdued with a collective effort of many.

How about you?

What lessons stood out for you regarding the observation?

Share your thoughts on the comment section below this article.

I am looking forward to what you have to say.

MPowRX Health and Wellness Products Inc

Got Something To Say?

Comments are encouraged, but you must follow our simple User Comment Rule below.
1. Keep it civil and stay on topic.
2. No profanity, vulgarity, racial slurs or personal attacks.
3. People who harass others or joke about tragedies will be blocked.





Have you Subscribed via RSS yet? Don't miss a post!

  • Log In or Register

  • Most Viewed Posts

  • Recent Facebook posts

    No recent Facebook posts to show

  • YCC Calendar

    April 2014
    S M T W T F S
    « Mar    
     12345
    6789101112
    13141516171819
    20212223242526
    27282930  
  • Twitter Authentication data is incomplete
  • YCC Tag Clouds

  • RSS Pick The Brain

  • RSS Forum Blue And Gold

  • Follow us on

    • Facebook
    • Twitter
  • Switch to our mobile site